Hearing Aids

How does a Hearing Aid work?

Hearing Aids consist of three simple parts - a microphone, an amplifier and a speaker. The Hearing Aid operates by receiving sound through the microphone, converting these sound waves into electronic signals and sending them to the amplifier. The amplifier determines the power of the signal and sends these signals to the ear via the speaker.

What kind of Hearing Aids are available?

Digital Hearing Aids are the newest form of Hearing Aid and are rapidly phasing out the older analogue style. Currently, there are four kinds of hearing aids available:

On the Ear (OTE)

On the Ear (OTE)

or "open" fitting, is the newest kind of hearing aid. They are a more discrete and attractive fitting and are suitable for mild to moderate hearing loss.

In the Ear (ITE)

In the Ear (ITE)

are used for people with mild to severe hearing loss. As the name suggests, the aid fits completely inside the outer ear. The case is made up of a hard plastic case that holds the electronic parts. ITE hearing aids are usually not fitted in children as they need to be replaced each time the ear canal grows.

Behind the Ear (BTE)

Behind the Ear (BTE)

Hearing Aids are used for people with mild to profound hearing loss. They consist of two sections. The outer section is made up of a plastic case that holds the electronics of the hearing aid. This is visible behind the ear. This case is connected to an ear mold that is inserted into the ear, through which the sound travels.

Canal aids

Canal aids

fit into the ear canal and are available in two styles. The in-the-canal (ITC) hearing aid is made to fit the size and shape of a person's ear canal. A completely-in-canal (CIC) hearing aid is nearly hidden in the ear canal. Both types are used for mild to moderately severe hearing loss. They usually are not recommended for young children or for people with severe to profound hearing loss.